Cape Royds

Cape Royds is notable for two things: Shackleton’s hut from his 1907 expedition, and an active penguin rookery.  We visited Cape Royds today to take water samples and samples of algal mats.  Here are a few photos from that visit.

Earnest Shackleton became Sir Earnest as a result of the 1907-1909 British Antarctic Expedition, also known as the Nimrod Expedition, after the ship used by the expedition.  Shackleton, Jameson Adams, Frank Wild and Eric Marshall reached to within less than 100 nautical miles of the South Pole on January 9, 1909.  This was a remarkable result for an expedition that had no government support, and was only surpassed by the successful trip of Amundsen and the fatal trip of Scott in 1911.

cape_royds--2

Shackleton’s hut on the left and the penguin rookery on the right. Pony Lake in the middle.  In the background is Backdoor Bay on the Ross Sea.

Cape Royds also hosts the southernmost colony of Adelie Penguins.

Adelie penguin rookery at Cape Royds.  Cape Royds is formed in black volcanic rock.  The color of the soil in the rookery is of biological origin.

Adelie penguin rookery at Cape Royds. Cape Royds is formed of stark black volcanic rock. The color of the soil in the rookery is of biological origin.

 

Shackleton's Hut

Shackleton’s Hut

Advertisements

One thought on “Cape Royds

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s